Subjects

Accounting | Art | Biology | Chemistry | Classical Studies | Computer Science | Economics | English | Geography | Maths A | Maths B | Physics

Accounting

Accounting aims to provide students with an introduction to accounting methods and concepts in a way which is challenging and rigorous and which emphasises both theory and practice.

Topics include:

  • Cash and accrual accounting
  • Budgeting
  • Cash flow
  • Depreciation
  • Assessment of performance
  • Accounting systems
  • Job costing
  • Financial statements for sole traders,partnerships and companies.

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Art

This subject aims to cover the four strands as outlined in the New Zealand Art Curriculum. Developing practical knowledge in the visual arts: In this strand students identify, select, and structure visual elements to communicate ideas and solve problems in the making of visual art works. Developing ideas in the visual arts: In this strand students develop ideas through observation, imagination and invention with materials.

Communicating and interpreting in the visual arts:
In this strand students investigate how meaning in the visual arts is mediated through art works, developing skills in analysing, interpreting, and evaluating images created by others.

Understanding the visual arts in context:
In this strand students develop knowledge and identify the purposes and contexts of the visual arts in society. They understand that visual culture reflects and is shown by the beliefs technologies, needs, and values of society.

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Biology

This subject aims to:

  • Develop an understanding of biological facts, definitions and principles with the capacity to communicate these logically and effectively. 
  • Design and perform a range of experimental procedures, showing skills in critical analysis, relating biological research, and the technology derived from it to our society
  • Apply biological knowledge and understanding to the rational solution of problems both inside and outside the classroom. 
  • Foster respect for intellectual honesty in the acquisition, presentation and rational interpretation of evidence. 

Topics include:

  • Genetics
  • Structure and function of the cell
  • Responses of plants and animals to biotic and abiotic factors
  • Evolution – primates and hominids
  • Written reports on practical exercises

Approximately one third of class time is devoted to practical work. Written reports on practical exercises are completed by each student.

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Chemistry

This subject aims to provide students with an adequate basis for subjects at university that require a prior knowledge of Chemistry at NZ Year 13 level. The content assumes knowledge at Year 12 (Form 6) level. Practical work is carried out with every topic.

Topics include:

  • Atomic theory
  • Chemical bonding and the shapes of molecules
  • Chemistry of transition elements, metal hydroxides, halogens, selected ions
  • Analysis of laboratory solutions and commercial products
  • Energy involved in physical and chemical changes
  • Aqueous Chemistry
  • Oxidation-reduction and applications
  • Organic Chemistry

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Classical Studies

Classical Studies aims at introducing students to the concepts that have formed the foundation of Western civilisation. It is a language rich subject that will study the art, architecture, history, philosophy and literature of ancient Rome and Greece.

This subject teaches the values and history that underpin most aspects of Western culture and civilisation.

This subject will be relevant to any B.A. degree but will also be a valuable adjunct to Commerce, the Sciences and the study or Art and Architecture.

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Computer Science

This subject is designed to provide students with a broad knowledge of computer technology, and to enable them to reach a high level of proficiency in the use of common application software types. The content of the subject incorporates both theoretical computing concepts and practical work to develop proficiency.

Topics include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Computer software
  • Operating systems
  • Specific business applications
  • Problem solving techniques used for programming.

Practical Requirement:  Practical skills learned include proficiency in both prgramming and in the use of major applications such as word processing, spread sheets and database programmes.

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Economics

The Economics programme for has been designed to provide students with an understanding of a wide spectrum of economic issues. Upon completion of the course, students will have an understanding of basic economic concepts and principles, policy options available for government and the probable consequences of economic decisions.

Topics include:

  • Relative scarcity and production possibilities
  • Demand, supply and the market
  • Market structures including monopoly
  • Externalities, public goods and government intervention
  • Equity and efficiency
  • The financial markets
  • Aggregate demand and supply and the macroeconomic economy.

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English

This subject aims to develop students' confidence and competency in understanding, speaking and writing English.

Topics include:

  • Listening – in small groups, classroom situations and lectures, showing understanding through oral formally-assessed listening exercises
  • Speaking – one-to-one and small group discussions, formal presentation to class, role-plays
  • Reading – note-taking from selected texts; the thematic study of selected texts; extended reading; study of a range of newspaper and magazine articles on current affairs and topics of general interest, showing understanding through formally-assessed comprehension exercises
  • Writing – practise of different styles; in particular, personal, argumentative and expository writing; paragraph and note-form summaries; preparation of research reports.

Attention is paid across all areas of study to accuracy of grammatical structure, spelling, punctuation and word use.

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Geography

This programme aims to provide an understanding of natural processes in the context of a geographic environment Students will focus on human actions that modify natural processes and analyse the outcomes. They will study the formation of natural features within the geographic environment.

Skills required:

  • To interpret topographic data using
  • maps, satellite images and photographs
  • To analyse a cultural process in a geographical context.

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Mathematics A

Mathematics A has been designed to cater for a wide range of student needs and is a prerequisite for most university courses. The subject will provide students with a broad range of mathematical knowledge and skills which will prepare students for a variety of university courses.

Topics include:

  • Algebra and Graphing of Functions
  • Exponentials and Logarithms
  • Correlation and Regression
  • Probability and Set Theory
  • Random Variables and their Distributions
  • Time Series
  • Linear Programming
  • Mathematical Modelling
  • Numerical Equation Solving
  • Binomial, Poisson and Normal
  • Distributions

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Mathematics B

This subject aims to provide students with an adequate basis for subjects at university that require a prior knowledge of Mathematics with Calculus at NZ Year 13 level. The content assumes knowledge of Mathematics at Year 12 (Form 6) level. It is also suited to students who enjoy mathematics. A scientific calculator is essential for this course.

Topics include:

  • Calculus – evaluation of limits. Differentiation and applications of differentiation. Rates of change. Integration and applications to include areas of planes and volumes of solids. Numerical integration. Differential equations and applications.
  • Algebra – calculations involving polynomials over real and complex numbers. Surds. Binomial expansions. Functions, composite and inverse functions. Exponential and logarithmic functions.
  • Trigonometry – trigonometric functions and inverses and reciprocals of these. Proving identities. Solving equations. Applications to two and three-dimensional problems.
  • Geometry – tangents and normals. Conic sections.

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Physics

This subject has been designed to provide students with an adequate basis for subjects at university which require a prior knowledge of Physics to NZ Year 13 level.

Topics include:

  • Light
  • Waves
  • Kinematics
  • Mechanics
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Atomic and Nuclear Physics

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